prettybutt:

30 Days Nathan/Audrey Challenge: Day 16 A SCENE WITH THEM THAT MAKE YOU HAPPY Reunion Dance

spookydragoneridan:

klokateercatlady:

ilikechildren—fried:

the-fault-in-our-youtubers:

It’s On Us: 

To RECOGNIZE that non-consensual sex is sexual assault.

To IDENTIFY situations in which sexual assault may occur.

To INTERVENE in situations where consent has not or cannot be given.

To CREATE an environment in which sexual assault is unacceptable and survivors are supported.

It’s On Us

Not Alone

hold up

a celebrity filled, gender-neutral, anti-sexual assault PSA?

and this isn’t a BuzzFeed parody?

I think I feel my heart growig three sizes

US’ president and vice-president is in that video. Please do watch it and show support.

(via fannishtalk)

austinpd1:

"You know who’s always been a very, healthy and moderating influence on me?"

(Source: 100percento, via tribecafilm)

nprglobalhealth:

A Doctor Turned Mayor Solves A Murder Mystery In Colombia
To improve global health, you can track sneezes. Or you can track bullets.
That’s what Rodrigo Guerrero did after he became mayor of Cali, Colombia, in 1992, an era when the South American nation led the world in intentional homicides (93 per 100,000 people).
Not only did he bring down the murder rate, but now he is being rewarded for his efforts. Monday, Guerrero became the first winner of the Roux Prize, a $100,000 award given by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington to someone who used evidence to have an impact on health.
Guerrero had no idea that guns would become a defining issue. “I wasn’t really interested in violence,” says the Harvard-trained physician, now 76, who had previously worked as an epidemiologist and president of the city’s university.
That’s not to say he was oblivious. Homicides were on his radar. But his priority as a new mayor was to improve public health.
"Once we obtained and cross-checked records, we saw that homicides were the No. 1 one cause of death, well beyond chronic and contagious diseases," Guerrero says. In Cali, the nation’s third-largest metropolis, the medical examiner recorded about five murders a day, and the homicide rate was five times greater than a decade ago.
Taking a lesson from his Harvard training, Guerrero led an unbiased, clinical examination of the killings.
He mimicked what doctors do when confronted with a disease outbreak. Violence often spreads like the flu in urban areas, and the key is to find the source.
Continue reading.
Photo: As the mayor of Cali, Colombia, epidemiologist Rodrigo Guerrero (left) meets with the police once a week to review murder statistics. (Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí)

I would, however,  point out that the “stop-and-frisk searches”  the article mentions were a) not completely racially motivated, as we were all rather brown to begin with, and yet b) spectacularly misused by police officers trying to make a buck. 

So I’m sorry NPR, I really do love your blog, but that little bit there, subtly implying New Yorkers ’ reaction to stop-and-frisk is anything less than justified..that was a weak, unfortunate connection to make in an otherwise nice write up of what happened in my home town. Thanks for trying, but careful with your implications.

nprglobalhealth:

A Doctor Turned Mayor Solves A Murder Mystery In Colombia

To improve global health, you can track sneezes. Or you can track bullets.

That’s what Rodrigo Guerrero did after he became mayor of Cali, Colombia, in 1992, an era when the South American nation led the world in intentional homicides (93 per 100,000 people).

Not only did he bring down the murder rate, but now he is being rewarded for his efforts. Monday, Guerrero became the first winner of the Roux Prize, a $100,000 award given by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington to someone who used evidence to have an impact on health.

Guerrero had no idea that guns would become a defining issue. “I wasn’t really interested in violence,” says the Harvard-trained physician, now 76, who had previously worked as an epidemiologist and president of the city’s university.

That’s not to say he was oblivious. Homicides were on his radar. But his priority as a new mayor was to improve public health.

"Once we obtained and cross-checked records, we saw that homicides were the No. 1 one cause of death, well beyond chronic and contagious diseases," Guerrero says. In Cali, the nation’s third-largest metropolis, the medical examiner recorded about five murders a day, and the homicide rate was five times greater than a decade ago.

Taking a lesson from his Harvard training, Guerrero led an unbiased, clinical examination of the killings.

He mimicked what doctors do when confronted with a disease outbreak. Violence often spreads like the flu in urban areas, and the key is to find the source.

Continue reading.

Photo: As the mayor of Cali, Colombia, epidemiologist Rodrigo Guerrero (left) meets with the police once a week to review murder statistics. (Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí)

I would, however, point out that the “stop-and-frisk searches” the article mentions were a) not completely racially motivated, as we were all rather brown to begin with, and yet b) spectacularly misused by police officers trying to make a buck. So I’m sorry NPR, I really do love your blog, but that little bit there, subtly implying New Yorkers ’ reaction to stop-and-frisk is anything less than justified..that was a weak, unfortunate connection to make in an otherwise nice write up of what happened in my home town. Thanks for trying, but careful with your implications.

(Source: yesknopemaybe, via tribecafilm)

(Source: avengah, via fannishtalk)

izzyandlouie:

Again I say,  more footsie under the table!

(Source: mrv3000)

nationalballet:

The first ever World Ballet Day will take place on Wednesday, October 1. This unprecedented collaboration will see five of the world’s leading ballet companies – The Australian Ballet, Bolshoi Ballet, The Royal Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada and San Francisco Ballet – presenting a live stream of rare behind-the-scenes action direct from their rehearsal studios.
The National Ballet of Canada’s live stream will begin at 10:00 am EST with company class and continue with rehearsals of Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s dramatic masterwork, Manon, which opens the 2014/15 season at Toronto’s Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts on November 8, and John Neumeier’s transformative work, Nijinsky, which runs November 22—30.
View the livestream at national.ballet.ca/worldballetday or visit our YouTube Channel on October 1 at 10:00 am.

nationalballet:

The first ever World Ballet Day will take place on Wednesday, October 1. This unprecedented collaboration will see five of the world’s leading ballet companies – The Australian BalletBolshoi BalletThe Royal Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada and San Francisco Ballet – presenting a live stream of rare behind-the-scenes action direct from their rehearsal studios.

The National Ballet of Canada’s live stream will begin at 10:00 am EST with company class and continue with rehearsals of Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s dramatic masterwork, Manon, which opens the 2014/15 season at Toronto’s Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts on November 8, and John Neumeier’s transformative work, Nijinsky, which runs November 22—30.

View the livestream at national.ballet.ca/worldballetday or visit our YouTube Channel on October 1 at 10:00 am.